,

Hero review|the film scores zero,here’s ever detail..

Sooraj Pancholi does a headstand on a platform of nails, drives a bulldozer through a wall, slams dudes through solid objects, does a laser dance in a disco and swings Athiya Shetty (who has taken three selfies within 15 seconds) around like a weapon to knock out a giant baddie. These are the first few minutes of Hero, directed by Nikhil Advani, and if there was any justice in this world, the film would have ended there. Unfortunately for Pancholi, Shetty and all those watching Hero, the world is cruel and unusual.

 

The pre-release buzz surrounding “Hero” is good and with Salman promoting the movie with the lead actors the buzz has increased considerably. But the film has failed to live up to the expectations of several critics.

Hero is a ’80s’ film that should never have been taken out of the vault. The dialogues, peppered with outdated flourishes like “imaandari ka pilla” and “aaj main surprise nahin, shock dene aaya hoon”, are melodramatic. The only twist in Hero is when Shetty ties up her hair. The fights are unexciting. The cinematography is dull and the songs sound like wailing cats in heat who have been auto-tuned. Salman Khan’s “Main Hoon Hero Tera” is the only example of melody in the soundtrack and Khan displays more acting in the sweet, little video of the song’s recording than he has in most of his blockbusters. Sadly, he shows up only at the end. There’s a lot to endure before you get your Bhai fix.

Sooraj (Pancholi) is a thug whose bulging muscles hide a heart as mushy as a roasted marshmallow. When he isn’t bodybuilding or beating up people, he’s helping the needy. For no fault of his own, he lands up in the middle of a glowering contest between baddie Pasha (Aditya Pancholi) and Inspector General Mathur (Tigmanshu Dhulia).

Pasha tells Sooraj to kidnap IG Mathur’s daughter, Radha (Shetty). Since Pasha is like a father to Sooraj — apparently, Sooraj’s mother was like a sister to Pasha, which hints at a rather incestuous family tree, but never mind those details — our buff hero spirits Radha away. It helps that Radha has the intelligence of a dull four-year-old. Despite having two policemen in the family (her father and brother), Radha finds nothing odd about a Mumbai police inspector taking her to a safe house in Jammu. It also doesn’t bother her that she’s in a wooden hut, in the middle of nowhere, with five strange men she’s never seen before and that these ‘policemen’ don’t let her call home. There are snowball fights, drunken nights around a bonfire and an occasionally shirtless Sooraj to ogle at … what more could a 20-something PYT want?

It is in this holy discotheque that Sooraj (Sooraj Pancholi), the leading henchman and foster son of gangster Pasha (Aditya Pancholi), first sets his eyes on Radha (Shetty), the daughter of the permanently unshaven Inspector General of Police Mathur (Tigmanshu Dhulia). Radha is a mildly spoilt lass who is tamed after a few dance moves by Sooraj. The thresholds for falling in love are low in this movie: Sooraj isn’t much of a dancer, but Radha, who is apparently a trained one, is smitten anyway.

The digital age

Pasha has ordered Radha’s abduction to pressure Mathur into getting him off the hook in a criminal case. Sooraj pretends to be part of Radha’s security detail and spirits her away to a snow-bound cottage where something resembling love blossoms between the star-crossed pair. Technology, which has radically progressed since the early 1980s, gives Sooraj’s location away and also inspires one of the movie’s corniest attempts to keep step with the youth demographic. Radha suggests to Sooraj that he should “control alt delete” – wipe out his past omissions and walk hand in hand with her into a new respectable future.

Sharad Kelkar, in the part of the supportive brother played by Sanjeev Kumar in the original, tries to protect Radha from their intransigent father, while Vivan Bhatena, stepping into the Shakti Kapoor role, briefly shows up to stretch the running time some more.

By the time interval strikes, you’ve got to feel bad for young Pancholi and Shetty. Sooraj and Radha may be sporting bruises that look like the make-up team was using lipstick to make tally marks — perhaps to show how many days of shooting these two newcomers had survived? — but the real wounds are deep. Varun Dhawan and Alia Bhatt got the vapid but glossy Student of the Year. Ranbir Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor got the nonsensical and lavish Saawariya. The son of Aditya Pancholi and daughter of Sunil Shetty get Hero, a film as B-grade as their fathers’ filmography. Hero is ill-conceived, outdated and lazily made, with neither director nor crew giving a hoot for details like continuity or logic. Pancholi and Shetty deserved better; not because they’re star kids, but because as actors they commit as much as they can to the colossal ineptitude that is their debut film.

 

Yet, rather than being a cakewalk, Hero is actually a serious challenge for both Pancholi and Shetty. Shetty has to showcase herself in a role that requires her to play a bimbo and make sure she doesn’t blink when the wind machine blows her hair away from her face. This is a shame because with her athletic frame and deadly cheekbones, it’s easy to imagine Shetty as a desi Lara Croft.

 

The bare-chested gimmick is no surprise, considering that this movie has been co-produced by Salman Khan Films. But even the Boss of the Beefcake has shown greater on-screen passion than the raw leads, whose youth and inexperience show up painfully in the many scenes of tender romance. Slow motion, soft light and molar-dislodging action fail to make Sooraj Pancholi a convincing action hero or give Athiya Shetty a serious shot at joining the list of actresses who dominate the screen. The next time round, try a little ardour?

The bare-chested gimmick is no surprise, considering that this movie has been co-produced by Salman Khan Films. But even the Boss of the Beefcake has shown greater on-screen passion than the raw leads, whose youth and inexperience show up painfully in the many scenes of tender romance. Slow motion, soft light and molar-dislodging action fail to make Sooraj Pancholi a convincing action hero or give Athiya Shetty a serious shot at joining the list of actresses who dominate the screen. The next time round, try a little ardour?

What do you think?

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *